Cultural, technological and affordability issues, not to mention physical access, are issues for firms trying to stimulate use of Internet apps and services. Instead of using the term “last name” in sign-up screens, for instance, it now uses the more universal “family name,” according to Facebook chief product officer Chris Cox.

“A word like ‘password’ is not a word that can be taken for granted,” Cox said. People may know they want Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp, but not understand the basics of creating an account. “We need to help them get started, rather than [say] ‘Hey, you’re a sophisticated American college student, set up your profile.’”

A new technology called Network Connection Class can match content display to available network speed (2G, for example, rather than 4G), thus improving end user experience.

That might mean lower-resolution graphics on a slower connection, at least while a higher-quality image is loading. Network Connection Class also allows offline viewing of content, an advantage in areas where connection availability is uncertain.

Facebook also is introducing a new ad format called “Slideshows” that rotates sequences of between three and seven still images.